WRITING GRAMMATICALLY CORRECT AND EFFECTIVE SENTENCES

Topics: Sentence, Dependent clause, Independent clause Pages: 6 (1934 words) Published: April 13, 2015
WRITING GRAMMATICALLY CORRECT AND EFFECTIVE SENTENCES

Sentences are groups of words arranged to express a complete thought.

Sentence Faults

A sentence becomes faulty when the idea expressed is incomplete or when it doesn’t make sense. Example:
My research report in business communication took a long time to prepare. And then turned out badly. (Incomplete idea in the second sentence.)

Prices ranging from $40 to $160 for courses gift certificates are available. (Doesn’t make sense. Is it the price of courses?)

Typical sentence faults are:

Sentence fragments
Run-on sentences
Comma splices

Sentence Fragments are groups of words that do not make sense because: The words are not arranged in proper grammatical order
Either the subject or the predicate is missing

Example
We are looking for a potential manager. An individual who can accept responsibility and supervise others.

The first sentence is correct because it makes complete sense. It has a subject (we)
a predicate (looking)
an object (potential manager)

But the second part is a fragment. Why?

When left as 2 sentences, the second sentence has a subject (an individual), but there is no verb to show the action that is done by the subject/individual or done on the subject/individual. The words “who can accept responsibility and supervise other employees’ are just complements of the subject, ‘individual’ (they give more details/information about the subject/individual). It lacks the object or the predicate part of the sentence. Therefore this group of words cannot stand alone as a sentence. How can we correct this?

By merging sentences and removing the redundant words.
We are looking for a potential manager, who can accept responsibility and supervise other employees.

Why is it correct now?When the sentences are merged, the 2nd part (An individual who can accept responsibility and supervise others) becomes the complement or the section that tells more about the object of the first sentence (a potential manager) instead of standing separately a sentence fragment (a broken piece of sentence).These the words ‘an individual’ is removed because they are redundant when the sentence has the noun ‘potential manager’ and the relative pronoun ‘who’ which refers to the manager.

Run-on- Sentences

A run-on sentence joins two or more complete thoughts without punctuation. This can be corrected by punctuating the sentence correctly or by correctly combining the thoughts/ideas in the sentence using appropriate conjunctions.
Example: Send an email message to all committee members tell them that our next meeting is planned for Friday.

Correction
Send an email message to all committee members. Tell them that our next meeting is planned for Friday. Send an email message to all committee members and tell them that our next meeting is planned for Friday.

Comma Splice
Comma splice happens when two sentences are incorrectly joined or spliced together with a comma. Commas are used to separate three or more elements of equal value in a series. A comma cannot be used to combine 2 sentences together.

Comma splice Example 1: You must fill one more purchase order, then your work is finished.

Correction: You must fill one more purchase order. Then your work is finished.

Comma splice Example 2: Many applicants responded to our advertisement, however only one had the proper training.

Correction: Many applicants responded to our advertisement; however, only one had the proper training. [In this sentence a subordinate clause is connected to the main clause using the conjunction ‘however’ therefore it needs a semi colon before it and a comma after it.

Writing Efficient Sentences

Sentences are efficient when they convey a thought:
Directly
Economically
Clearly
Emphatically
Coherently

Revising wordy phrases
To convey an idea/thought using fewest possible words:
Avoid wordy phrases and substitute them...
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